Covid-19 update

Monorail Music is continuing to follow Scottish Government advice with regard to Covid-19. We are currently under lockdown restrictions and are currently not operating a click and collect service. Our mailorder service is operating as normal, with a reduced staff.

TV Priest

Uppers

Sub Pop

Released: 8th February 2021

LP Colour Vinyl£21.99Out of Stock


The debut album from London four-piece TV Priest embraces the beautiful and terrifying unknowns that exist personally, politically and culturally. Posing as many questions as it answers, ‘Uppers’ is a thunderous opening statement that continues the UK’s recent resurgence of grubby, furious post-punk music. It says something very different though - something completely its own.

Four childhood friends who made music together as teenagers before drifting apart and then, somewhat inevitably, back together late in 2019, TV Priest was borne out of a need to create together once again and brings with it a wealth of experience and exhaustion picked up in the band’s years of pursuing ‘real life’ and ‘real jobs’, something those teenagers never had. Last November, the band - vocalist Charlie Drinkwater, guitarist Alex Sprogis, bass and keys player Nic Smith and drummer Ed Kelland - played their first show, to a smattering of friends in what they describe as an “industrial freezer” in the warehouse district of Hackney Wick. “It was like the pub in Peep Show with a washing machine just in the middle…” Charlie laughs, remembering how they dodged Star Wars memorabilia and deep fat fryers while making their first statement as a band. Unsurprisingly, there isn’t a precedent for launching a band during a global
pandemic but among the general sense of anxiety and unease pervading everything at the moment, TV Priest’s entrance in April with the release of debut single ‘House Of York’ - a searing examination of the Monarchy set over wiry post-punk and fronted by a Mark E. Smith-like mouthpiece - served as a breath of fresh air among the chaos, its anger and confusion making some kind of twisted sense to the nation’s fried brains.