Covid-19 update

Monorail Music continues to follow Scottish Government advice with regard to Covid-19. We're delighted to announce our re-opening from Monday 26 April at 11am. We will have reduced capacity with social distancing and ask that customers wear masks while in the shop. However, browsing is possible.

Entrance for now is via Osborne Street. We will be closed on Sundays, open Monday to Saturday 11-6.

Thanks for your continuing support. You helped get us through this.

Josef K

Sorry For Laughing

LTMLP2549

Released: 4th June 2021

Clear Vinyl LP + CD£22.99Out of Stock


LTM presents a limited edition clear vinyl edition of Sorry For Laughing, the legendary first album by cult Scottish guitar group Josef K, recorded for Postcard Records but destined to become the great ‘lost album’ of the post-punk era.
This remastered edition of Sorry For Laughing replicates the original Robert Sharp artwork (a solarised portrait of the band atop Calton Hill, printed in silver pantone), with detailed sleeve notes on the inner bag, and the added bonus of a 12 track CD, The TV Art Demos, featuring all tracks from the band’s very first recording sessions in 1979.
Recorded at Castle Sound Studios (Edinburgh) in November 1980, Sorry For Laughing should have been issued as Postcard 81-1, but was shelved after the band and label boss Alan Horne decided the 12-song set sounded too polished. Perhaps two dozen white-label copies in unmade sleeves exist, and have sold for as much as £1,000 amongst collectors. Josef K issued their second stab at a debut album, The Only Fun In
Town, in July 1981 – only to split after completing a promotional tour. This remastered edition of Sorry For Laughing replicates the original Robert Sharp artwork (a solarised
portrait of the band atop Calton Hill, printed in silver pantone), with detailed sleeve notes on the inner bag, and the added bonus of a 12 track CD, The TV Art Demos, featuring all tracks from the band’s very first
recording sessions in 1979.

They were The Sound of Young Scotland, together with Orange Juice, whose guitars were also radiant and
brittle, whose rhythms were also scrubbed and blunt, whose vocals were also proud and serious, but who
sounded like another group entirely’ (Paul Morley); ‘In retrospect, their aborted attempt at a debut album
feels much superior to what was finally released. The early versions of the songs sound superbly coiled and
keen, the sublime poise of Endless Soul their truly timeless blaze of glory’ (Simon Reynolds)